31 December 2011

 

From the Office of Rampart Herald

Baron Randal Carrick (Randall Jackson)

rampart@outlandsheralds.org

 

Unto the Sovereigns and members of the College of Arms of the Society, does Randal Carrick, Rampart Herald send his greetings. What follows is the January 2012 Letter of Intent for the Kingdom of the Outlands. I would like to thank the following heralds for providing commentary for this letter: Mistress Francesca de Pavia, Ray-de-Soleil Pursuivant, Master Louis-Philippe Mitouard, Catspaw Herald Extraordinary; THL Eric Morrison, Hawk's Hollow Pursuivant; Lady Leonor Ruiz de Lison; Lord Andrew von Otelingen; Lady Katelin de Irlande; Lady Khalidah bint Yayah, Castle Herald; Faelan O' Laghlan, Readstan Pursuivant; Ines Alfon, Blanch Tiger Herald; Lady Shoshanah Simkhah bas Ruven; Baron Andros Korkyrates; Baron Angus McFarland; Don Estevan Sepultura; Lady Barbary Bramble; Lord Mathom of Erlinstar; Lady Aritŕ gunŕ Akasa; Lady Rohese de Dinan, Shadowdale Pursuivant; and Gawain of Miskbridge, Green Anchor Herald.

It is my intent to register this January the following items from the Outlands College of Heralds:

1: Alasdair MacDubhghaill the Scot - New Name & New Device

Per saltire sable and gules, in a pale a dove displayed and sword argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

originally submitted as Alasdair Scott MacDh¨ghaill, the name was changed at Kingdom to accommodate submitter's desire to have "Scot" in the name, while maintaining a plausibly period name

[Alasdair] - Dictionary of English Surnames Reaney and Wilson SN: MacAlaster 1455 Black Gaelic Mac Alasdair

[MacDh¨ghaill] - Dictionary of English Surnames Reaney and Wilson SN: MacDougal 1497 Black Gaelic MacDh¨ghaill

The spelling of the surname was changed based on the following commentary:

 

 

Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (Aldyrne) at 2011-12-11 21:00:17

"[MacDh¨ghaill] - Dictionary of English Surnames Reaney and Wilson SN: MacDougal 1497 Black Gaelic MacDh¨ghaill"

This summary is misleading. It seems to imply that Reaney and Wilson say that Black dates the form <MacDh¨ghaill> to 1497, which is incorrect.

The entry in RW (p. 291) under Macdougal (not MacDougal) says:

Macdougal, [other headers]: [dated forms from sources other than Black] Robert M'Kowele 1370-80 Black; Nigel MakCowl 1497 ib. Gael MacDh¨ghaill 'Son of Dhubgall'.

So, it's the Scots form MakCowl that Reaney and Wilson say Black dates to 1497. Lacking dates for it, I would assume that the form MacDh¨ghaill that Reaney and Wilson give is a Modern Scottish Gaelic form.

Black (p. 487 s.n. MACDOUGAL) says: "G. MacDh¨ghaill, 'son of Dougal,' [...]". When Black says "G." or "Gaelic", and gives no dates, he means Modern Scottish Gaelic.

So, unfortunately, we don't have evidence of the submitted form MacDh¨ghaill as a form used in period.

Sharon Krossa, in her article "Scottish Gaelic Given Names: For Men" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/men.shtml), lists Dubhghall as a standardized form and indicates she has found examples of this name in the 15th and 16th centuries. This implies that a grammatically correct form Mac Dubhghaill would be reasonable at least for the end of period. Based on the forms such as MacCoull 1557, M'Cowyll 1517, and the like, shown in Black (p. 487 s.n. MACDOUGAL), it seems that a lenited form, Mac Dhubhghaill is also reasonable for this time period.

 

 


2: Andros Korkyrates - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

[Andros] - Submitter's mundane give name, baptismal certificate provided

 

[Korkyrates] - Korkya is the Latinized spelling (Greek: Κόρκυρα) of several locations in the Greek islands (specifically the island of Korčula as well as other islands and towns) that have existed under this name since the 12th century BC. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kor%C4%8Dula) The modern Greek spelling is Kerkyra. The locative by name is formed by the possessive of the toponym by adding [tes]. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_nouns#Masculines_in_es) (http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/people/shipley/pseudo-skylax)

During commentary, submitter provided further documentation for the construction of the surname:

> > From: Noel E Lenski <Lenski@colorado.edu>

> > Date: Sat, Jan 14, 2012 at 4:02 PM

> > Subject: RE: resending that strange question for you

> > To: Unlikely <unlikely@gmail.com>

> >

> >

> > On this question, ethnonyms come in a variety of forms; someone from

> > Athens is an Athenaios, someone Sparta a Lakedaimonios, someone from

> > Corcyra is in fact a Korkyrates, but someone from Gaza is a Gazenos...

> > so there is no one pattern.

> >

> > Noel Lenski Ph.D.

> > Department of Classics, University of Colorado


TES Ending, Toponimic-based

Niketas Choniates (Khoniates) a.k.a. Acominatus; Byzanthine historian,

mid-12th century; named after his birthplace city of Chonae, in

province of Phrygia

Mikhaelos Attaleiates (Attaliates); Byzanthine statesman and

historian, mid-11th century; named after the town of Attalia in

Pamphylia

Ioseph Tarchaneiotes; Byzanthine general (strategos), mid-11th

century; named after Tarchanaion in Thrace

Theodoros Metochites; Byzanthian scholar, 14th century; named after

province of Metochia

Gregorios Taronites ; Byzanthian solider, 10th century; named after

the principality of Taron

Source:

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy :

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTINE%20NOBILITY.htm (Plenty of

additional examples as well).

while addign -tes to the ending of a placename is not always the proper construction of a locative byname within the region and time period, it is certainly _one_ of the methods, and is the correct construction for Korkyra.


3: Cedwyn Chwith - New Name

Sound (undefined) most important.

the name was changed at Kingdom from Cedwyn Cwydd, to match the documented spelling.

[Cedwyn] - "Enwau Cymraeg I Blant", Welsh Names for Children, Heini Gruffudd

[Cwydd] - 'The Compleat Anachronist #66' "A Welsh Miscellany" by Heather Rose Jones. Submitter states 'The spelling she [Jones] gave was Chwith, meaning left-handed. I feel the current spelling in more in keeping with 9th Century Cymru.'

while submitter's documentation of the given name is insufficient, commenters have provided sufficient basis to justify this spelling as a saint's name:

 

 

There has been a place of worship at Llangedwyn since medieval times. St. Cedwyn was perhaps one of King Arthur's knights, surviving his last battle and becoming a hermit. During the Middle Ages St Cedwyn's church was a daughter church of Llanrhaeadr and was looked after by a succession of priests entitled "Athro" or "Meistr" who held office in the "Clas" there. A fourteenth century effigy in the sanctuary perhaps represents Yr Athro Griffith and survives from a wooden church rebuilt in stone at the time of the Reformation. From this later church only the pulpit, some monuments, and woodwork were retained when the church was rebuilt in 1869 on the orders of Sir Watkin Williams Wynn. The present church consists of a nave and chancel with south aisle, west porch, vestry, and a bell-cote with one bell. Monuments and stained glass commemorate the Vaughan family of Llangedwyn Hall, their successors the Williams-Wynn, and the Bonnor-Maurice family of Bryn-y-Gwalia. Sir Watkin's two young daughters donated a monumental font, which has a medieval predecessor in the porch. In the 1920s, two large dormer windows improved the quality of light in the church. More recent developments included the acquisition of a small pipe-organ, new carpets, kneelers, and seat-liners given in memory of the 10th Sir Watkin. The year 2001 marked the completion of re-roofing, re-lighting and redecoration of the church. The well-kept churchyard, containing several interesting monuments, has been enlarged twice in the last century. -- http://llanfyllindeanery.org.uk/parishes/cedwyn.htm


Margaret Makafee at 2011-12-11 23:08:15

The Lives of the British Saints: The Saints of Wales, Cornwall, and ..., Vol 2 By S. Baring-Gould, John Fisher, (http://books.google.com/books?id=uE3pXSdZd5gC) p 98, notes S. CEDWYN, Confessor. Cedwyn was hte son of Gwgon Gwron ab Peredur ab Eliffer Gosgoddfawr, by Matrun, daughter of Gwrthefyr Fendigaid....Cedwyn is the patron of Llangedwyn in Denbighshire,. Scwgan, the name of one of its two townships, is believed to stand for Esgair Wgan, the Ridge or Hill of Gwgan, embodying his father's name. Lewis Glyn Cothi, in the fifteenth century, invoked Cedwyn in two of his poems. In the Book of Lan Dav, Lann Cetguinn in Ystrad Yw (a commote in south-east Breconshire) is named among the churches which were consecrated by Bishop Herwald (died 1104), but there do not appear to be any traces of it now. In the same work, Cum Cetguinn is mentioned in the boundary of the parish of Wonastow, mear Monmouth. Nant Cedwyn is the name of a brook which runs into the Ely in the parish of Leckwith near Cardiff, and Cwqm Cedwyn is the woody dell on the right bank of the Ely...The Cedwyn of Ynys Cedwyn in North Glamorgan, near the junction of the Twrch with the Tawe, is said to have been a giant.

The aforementioned poem is found here: http://books.google.com/books?id=5PiO6pzwKG4C&pg=PA30&dq=cedwyn+llan&hl=en&ei=AIvlTuuIJuPV0QGP66C-BQ &sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&sqi=2&ved=0CGMQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=cedwyn%20llan&f=false

 

 


4: Felix Sniumi - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name on the Outlands LoI of June 30, 2011 as submitted.

Per fess argent and purpure, a fox courant to sinister regardant and a bordure sable.

 

Submitter's name was registered on the September 2011 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/09/11-09lar.html) via the Outlands.

 

Submitter's device, Per fess argent and purpure, a fox courant to sinister regardant sable, was returned on the September 2011 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/09/11-09lar.html) stating the following:

 

This device is returned for conflict with the badge of Lorn Stark, (Fieldless) A wolf courant contourny sable. There is only one CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for the difference between a fox and a wolf.

 

This device is also in conflict with the badge of Malcolm Leslie the Scot, (Fieldless) A Scottish terrier statant contourny sable. There is one CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for the difference between a fox and a Scottish terrier, nor for the difference between courant and statant.

 

Submitter has cleared the conflicts by adding a bordure for a second CD.


5: Katerinka Korsakova - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2010, via the Outlands

Purpure, on a bend between two oak sprigs inverted argent, three foxes passant palewise gules

 

Submitter's name, Katerinka Korsakova, was registered on the December 2010 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/12/10-12lar.html) via the Outlands.


6: Lelien Widoeghe - Resub Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2009, via the Outlands

Per pale argent and vert, four fleurs-de-lys counterchanged

Old Item: Argent, on a pile rayonny vert, a lily of the valley slipped and leaved argent, to be retained as a badge.

Submitter's name was registered on the January 2009 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/loar/2009/01/09-01lar.html) via the Outlands.

 

Submitter's current device, Argent, on a pile rayonny vert, a lily of the valley slipped and leaved argent, was registered on the January 2010 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/01/10-01lar.html) via the Outlands.

 

Submitter's device change, Per pale vert and argent, six fleur-de-lys two, two, and two counterchanged, was returned on the August 2011 LoR (http://rampart.outlandsheralds.org/2011-07-lop/1108-lor.html) stating the following:

 

 

RETURNED for conflict with Helena Sibylla, reg. 4/10 via the Middle: Per pale vert and argent all semy-de-lys counterchanged. Unless we count a CD between six and an indeterminate number (and we do not), there are no countable differences between the devices at all.

 

 

Submitter reduced the number of fleur-de-lys to four and swapped the tinctures to help clear the stated conflict.

 

Submitter wishes to retain her current device as a badge.


7: Unser Hafen, Barony of - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 1991, via the Outlands

Per pale vert and Or, a chainless portcullis and a bordure counterchanged.

This submission is to be associated with Unser Hafen, Barony of

8. Unser Hafen, Barony of. Badge Resubmission (Laurel). Per pale vert and Or, a chainless portcullis and a bordure counterchanged.

(Unser Hafen) Submitter's name was registered as Unser Hafen, Shire of on the October 1985 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/1985/10/lar.html) via Atenveldt and updated to Unser Hafen, Barony of on the February 1991 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/1991/02/lar.html) via the Outlands.

 

Submitter's badge, Vert, a portcullis within a bordure embattled Or, was returned on the June 2009 LoR (http://rampart.outlandsheralds.org/2009-05-lop/0906-lor.html) stating the following:

 

Returned for conflict: Atenveldt, Kingdom of (01/96, Atenveldt) "Vert, a portcullis Or," with one CD for adding the bordure; and with Malcolm MacLeod of Caer Adamant (05/05, East), "Sable, a portcullis and a bordure embattled Or," with one CD for changing the field tincture.

 

Submitter's badge, [Fieldless] A chainless portcullis vert, was pended on the April 2010 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/04/10-04lar.html) and returned on the October 2010 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/10/10-10lar.html) stating the following:

 

This badge was pended on the April 2010 LoAR for discussion of whether or not we wished to protect the symbol of Parliament.

 

This badge is returned for conflict with the badge of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Beauforts/Tudors, (Tinctureless) A portcullis (sometimes crowned). There is a CD for the lack of tincture, but no other CD. We note that, while the barony has many other vert portcullises, the conflict is not grandfathered, since each of the registered badges has at least a CD for possessing tincture and a CD for the addition of a tertiary or overall charge group.

We remind commenters that a correctly drawn portcullis does not need to include chains. A period rendition of a chainless portcullis can be found in Siebmacher, plate 136, row 3, column 4, the arms of die Hessen zu Wingdorf.

 

Submitter's badge, Per pale vert and or, a portcullis counterchanged, was returned on the September 2011 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/09/11-09lar.html) stating the following:

 

This badge is returned for conflict with the badge of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Beauforts/Tudors, (Tinctureless) A portcullis (sometimes crowned). There is a CD for the lack of tincture, but no other CD. A tinctureless badge is protected in all tinctures, including divided tinctures.

 

As noted in the prior return, while the barony has many other vert portcullises, the conflict is not grandfathered, since each of the registered badges has at least a CD for possessing tincture and a CD for the addition of a tertiary or overall charge group.

 

This time Submitter has added a counterchanged bordure to provide a second CD.


8: `Arif al-A`rabi - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 1100-1250, Arabic/Persian forces under the command of Saladin.
Language (Arif - mystic, Persian; al-Arabi -) most important.
Culture (Arif - mystic, Persian; al-Arabi -) most important.
Meaning (Arif - mystic, Persian; al-Arabi -) most important.

[Arif] - "Persian Given Names in the NafahÔt al-uns" by Ursula Whitcher, ['┬rif] (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/nafahat/givennames.html)

 

[al-Arabi] - "Masculine Cognomens used as Isms" by David B. Appleton, [al-A'rabi] (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm)

the name was changed at Kingdom from Arif al-Arabi based on the following commentary:

 

 

Magnus von LŘbeck at 2011-12-21 21:33:50

No conflict found.

`Arif al-A`rabi appears correct from the documentation below.

Persian Masculine Names in the Nafah.Ôt al-uns by Ursula Whitcher

www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/nafahat/givennames.html

Introduction - "The Nafah.Ôt al-uns is a biographical dictionary, written in Persian, of influential Sufis. It was compiled by the fifteenth-century writer Nűr al-Dţn `Abd al-Rah.mÔn JÔmţ."

Name Origins and Structure - "The given names are uniformly Arabic in origin; this could be an artefact of the data, since the men in question were prominent religious figures, but it could also reflect a broader trend in Persian naming."

Note on Special Characters - "My source transcribed the names from Persian using standard scholarly conventions. The transliteration used some special characters which can't be displayed using standard HTML. In the following lists of names, a circumflex (^) above a letter stands for a bar above that letter, and a period following a letter stands for a small dot below that letter."

Full Names List - `┬rif Rţwgirawţ

 

 


Respectfully submitted,

Baron Randal Carrick, Rampart Herald



Kingdom of the Outlands



rampart@outlandsheralds.org